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Mohs Micrographic Surgery

 

 

Beverly Hospital
85 Herrick Street
Beverly, MA 01915
978.524.7933

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

Beverly Hospital offers Mohs micrographic surgery to treat certain types of skin cancer. Named after the general surgeon who developed the procedure, Mohs surgery is primarily used to treat basal and squamous cell carcinomas on a critical anatomical site, such as the nose, eyelid, lip or fingertip, where it is important to maximally preserve tissue for functional or cosmetic purposes. Another indication is in tumors that have recurred after conventional surgery. The technique is also applied to malignant melanoma but unlike the traditional technique, Mohs removes less facial tissue.

Individual layers of cancerous tissue are removed and examined under a microscope one at a time until all cancerous tissue has been removed. The wound may be closed with stitches, a skin graft or a flap. Often, due to the tissue-conserving Mohs technique, no reconstructive surgery is needed and the small wound heals naturally. For extensive tumors, the patient's care is coordinated with other Beverly Hospital specialists in oculoplastics, ENT [ear, nose, throat) plastics or general cosmetic plastics.

squamous cell carcinoma

Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma on the left nasal sidewall

Cure rates for basal and squamous cell carcinoma are roughly 99 percent for patients undergoing the procedure for the first time, and 96 percent for patients with tumors that have failed conventional plastic surgery. For melanoma, patient survival is based upon tumor thickness and ulceration, and evidence of spread to the sentinel node.

Most often Mohs surgery is an office-based procedure using a local anesthetic. Typically all procedures are completed in one day. Physicians who perform Mohs surgery are trained in dermatology and pathology. The lead physician who is performing Mohs surgery at Beverly Hospital is Gary S. Rogers M.D. The patient benefits from a multi-specialty team of physicians and surgeons, nurses, therapists and technologists.

For more information about Mohs surgery, click here.