Close Close
   
 
 
     

After the Birth of Your Baby

 

There is often much excitement among family and friends when a baby is born. During this joyous time, remember to take care of yourself and listen to your body’s need for rest and recovery. Don’t hesitate to let others know when you need to be alone with your baby and when you need to sleep.

Visiting Hours

General visiting hours are from 11 am to 8 pm. Visitors should be free of any illnesses (such as colds, flu or contagious diseases). Visiting children, including siblings, must be accompanied by an adult. The father of the baby, significant other/partner, grandparents, and siblings of the baby may visit at any time.

Family-Centered Care

Your baby will spend the majority of the time with you in your room. It’s a time for you to learn your baby’s cues and how to take care of your baby’s needs. Our family-centered care includes encouraging skin-to-skin contact between you and your baby, while you are awake. Mothers and babies are considered a pair, and the same maternity nurse will care for both of you. Our nurses are always available to support you and answer any questions.

Your room will be equipped with a cot so that your significant other can stay overnight in your room with you and your baby.

Breastfeeding Support

In addition to our Prenatal Breastfeeding Class, Beverly Hospital is pleased to offer additional resources to support breastfeeding mothers. Your nurse will help you with breastfeeding, and our certified lactation consultants are available for additional education and support.

We also offer a Lactation Boutique, which offers breast pump rentals, bras, pillows, pumps and accessories for sale. A Lactation Boutique cart is available to come to your room to allow you to purchase any supplies you may need. All of our products are sold at a discounted rate below the manufacturer’s suggested retail price.

Our staff can help you select the bra and supplies that fit your lifestyle. The staff at the Lactation Boutique may be reached at 978-816-2202 or at 978-927-9103.

Your Baby's Medical Care

Your baby’s doctor will see your baby at the hospital to perform an exam and assess his or her overall health. In addition, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health requires that all newborns receive the following:

  • Eye ointment to prevent any infections caused by the birth process.
  • Vitamin K injection, which helps the baby’s blood to clot.
  • A hepatitis B vaccine, to help prevent this severe liver infection that can lead to liver failure, liver cancer and death.
  • A blood test to determine if the baby has any metabolic disorders that need immediate treatment.
  • A newborn hearing screening that is quick, easy and not painful. It is important to recognize hearing loss as early as possible so that appropriate interventions can be made.
  • Critical congenital heart defect (CCHD) screening. Some babies born with a heart defect appear healthy at first but are at risk of serious complications within the first few days or weeks of life. This simple and painless test takes just a few minutes and measures how much oxygen is in your baby’s blood. It is done by taping sensors to the baby’s hand and foot that lead to a monitor.

If you have any questions about these tests, speak to your nurse or the baby’s doctor.

Safe Sleep Guidelines For Baby

These important practices will begin in the hospital and should be continued at home.

  • Always place your baby on his or her back to sleep.
  • Keep your baby close by, but in his or her own crib, with a firm mattress and a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Don’t put toys, blankets, pillows or bumper pads in your baby’s crib.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Keep your baby cool; don’t overheat the room.

Perinatal Mood Complications & Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression sometimes affects women during pregnancy and/or after childbirth. It is different from “the blues” that people may experience from time to time. Postpartum depression can cause feelings of extreme anxiety, sadness and exhaustion. It may also cause repetitive or disturbing thoughts. A woman with postpartum depression can have trouble caring for her baby, her family and herself.

Postpartum mood complications and postpartum depression are treatable. If you experience any of these or similar feelings, tell your healthcare provider or nurse.

Birth Certificates And Social Security Cards

You may obtain a copy of your child’s birth certificate at the Beverly Town Hall after two weeks. Please note that Beverly Hospital does not issue birth certificates and does not maintain copies.

Your baby’s Social Security card will be mailed to your residence in about one month. If you have any questions regarding your baby’s Social Security card, you may contact the Social Security Administration at 800-772-1213.

Baby Portraits

Beverly Hospital offers the option of professional photography to new parents, with a photo session that takes place right in your hospital room. There is no charge for the photo session itself; you only pay for the photos if you choose. Items purchased while you are at the hospital are delivered to your room before you leave.

You also may create your baby’s own personal website by visiting www.welcomenewborn.com and following the instructions to create your baby’s Welcomesite.